CONTENTS

1.         INTRODUCTION................................................................................................................. 2

1.1           Project Background....................................................................................................................................... 2

1.2           Scope of the Deliverable............................................................................................................................... 2

2.         VEGETATION SURVEY FINDINGS...................................................................................... 3

2.1           Literature Review........................................................................................................................................... 3

2.2           Detailed Vegetation Survey.......................................................................................................................... 4

2.2.1           Survey Method............................................................................................................................ 4

2.2.2           Survey Findings.......................................................................................................................... 4

3.         METHODOLOGY OF TRANSPLANTATION......................................................................... 7

3.1           Preparation before Transplanting................................................................................................................ 7

3.2           Transplanting the Plants............................................................................................................................... 7

3.3           Selection and Preparation of Receptor Site(s).......................................................................................... 8

3.4           Planting the Plants at Receptor Site(s)....................................................................................................... 8

3.4.1           Saplings of Incense Tree........................................................................................................... 8

3.4.2           Lamp of Tartary and Bottlebrush Orchid.................................................................................. 9

3.5           IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMME........................................................................................................... 9

4.         POST-TRANSPLANTATION MAINTENANCE AND MONITORING....................................... 10

5.         REPORTING..................................................................................................................... 11

 

 

 

 

List of Figures

Figure 1.1 – Project Site and Previously Recorded Flora Species of Conservation Importance Figure 2.1 – Recorded Plant Species of Conservation Importance within NENTX under the Current

Study

Figure 3.1 – Proposed Receptor Site

 

 

 

 

List of Appendices

Appendix A – Habitat Photos

Appendix B – Photos of Recorded Plant Species of Conservation Importance within NENTX Appendix C – Schedule of Recorded Plant Species of Conservation Importance within NENTX Appendix D – Sample Data Sheet for Post-Transplantation Monitoring

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

IEC verification letter

ET certification letter

1.              INTRODUCTION

 

1.1           Project Background

The North East New Territories (NENT) Landfill is reaching its designed capacity.  The Environmental Protection Department (EPD) is actively pressing ahead the NENT Landfill Extension to extend the capacities of the landfill, with the view to meeting the long-term waste disposal needs of Hong Kong.

The North East New Territories Landfill Extension (the NENTX Project) is a designated project. The Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) Report and the Environmental Permit (EP) were approved and issued under the EIA Ordinance on 20 September 2007 and 26 November 2007, respectively.

In order to fulfil the EP conditions as well as the requirements set out in the Technical Circular issued by Development Bureau (DEVB TC(W) No.4/2020) on ecological mitigation measure implementation and tree preservation, ecological (vegetation, aquatic fauna and tree) surveys shall be carried out with the purpose of providing details for the formulation and implementation of transplantation and translocation scheme for the flora and fauna located within the NENTX Project area prior to the commencement of the NENTX Project.

The Environmental Protection Department, Hong Kong (the Client) have commissioned ERM-Hong Kong, Limited (ERM) to undertake the Provision of Consultancy Services for Study on Ecological Conditions and Corresponding Transplantation and Translocation for NENT Landfill Extension (the Services), which commenced on 15 March 2021.  The Project Site of NENTX is shown in Figure 1.1.

In the approved EIA Report (AEIAR-111/2007) for the NENTX Project, four flora species of conservation importance, i.e. Aquilaria sinensis, Rhododendron simsii, Endospermum chinense, and Arundina graminifolia, were recorded within the boundary of NENTX (Figure 1.1).

As required in Clause 2.7 of the EP (EP-292/2007), “the Permit Holder shall, no later than one month before the commencement of construction of the Project, submit to the Director for approval four hard copies and one electronic copy of a detailed vegetation survey covering the affected habitats located within the Project area for the purpose of updating, identifying and recording the location and number, health condition and suitability for transportation of the affected individual plant species in order to provide details for the transplantation scheme.  The survey shall cover the four plant species of conservation importance including the Aquilaria sinensis, Rhododendron simsii, Endospermum chinense and Arundina graminifolia at the locations shown in the Figure 3 of the EP (1).  The detailed vegetation survey shall be prepared by a qualified botanist or ecologist and shall be certified by the Environmental Team (ET) Leader and verified by the Independent Environmental Checker (IEC) as conforming to the information and recommendations contained in the approved EIA Report”.

This Detailed Vegetation Surveys and Transplantation Proposal has therefore been prepared to fulfil the above EP condition.

 

1.2           Scope of the Deliverable

Following this introductory section, the remainder of this Detailed Vegetation Surveys and Transplantation Proposal is arranged as follows:

(a). Section 2 presents the findings of desktop research, site visits and vegetation surveys;

(b). Section 3 describes the detailed methodology of transplanting the plant species of conservation importance; and

(c). Section 4 specifies the post-transplantation maintenance and monitoring requirements on the establishment of the transplanted flora specimens at the receptor sites.

(d). Section 5 specifies the reporting requirements during the post-transplantation maintenance and monitoring period.

 

 

1      Figure 3 mentioned in Clause 2.7 of the EP (EP-292/2007) shows the same locations as in Figure 1.1 of this report.


2.              VEGETATION SURVEY FINDINGS

 

As detailed in the Final Ecological Survey Plan, a desktop review of existing literature was conducted and a detailed vegetation survey covering the green and purple areas in Figure 1.1 was carried out. The following sections detail the findings of the literature review and the vegetation survey.

 

2.1           Literature Review

Previous EIAs and other studies that covered part or the entire area of the current Project Site have been reviewed, and they include the following:

n   EIA-190/2010 – Liantang / Heung Yuen Wai Boundary Control Point and Associated Works(2) (Mott 2010), and

n   EIA-133/2007 – North East New Territories (NENT) Landfill Extension(3) (Arup 2007, i.e. the approved EIA Report)

As mentioned in Section 1.1, four flora species of conservation importance were recorded in the approved EIA Report (Arup 2007). During the eight-month ecological baseline survey from March to October 2005 covering dry and wet seasons under the study, the vegetation survey was conducted within the NENTX Project Site.  Four flora species of conservation importance were recorded within the Project Site, including Aquilaria sinensis, Endospermum chinense, Rhododendron simsii and Arundina graminifolia.  Details of the flora species of conservation importance are shown in Table 2.1 and their locations are shown in Figure 1.1.

 

Table 2.1: Flora Species of Conservation Importance Recorded Previously

 

Scientific Name

Chinese Name

Conservation/ Protection Status

Aquilaria sinensis

土沉香

Common in Hong Kong, protected under Cap. 586; listed in Illustrations of Rare & endangered plant in Guangdong Province (Wu & Hu, 1988) and Threatened Species List of China's Higher Plants (Vulnerable, endemic species) (Qin et al., 2017), status in China as "Near Threatened" (AFCD 2003), listed as "Vulnerable" in China Plant Red Data Book, under State protection (Category II) in China (AFCD 2003), listed in Appendix II of CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna),

classified as "Vulnerable" on the IUCN Red List.

Endospermum chinense

黃桐

Restricted (Xing et al., 2000)

Rhododendron simsii

紅杜鵑

Protected under Cap. 96A, but is very common in Hong Kong.

Arundina graminifolia

竹葉蘭

Protected under Cap. 96A and Cap. 586, listed in Appendix II of CITES.

Note:

1.          Conservation and/or Protection Status:

a.       AFCD (2003): Rare and Precious Plants of Hong Kong. Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department, HKSAR, Hong Kong.

b.       Cap. 96A: Forestry Regulations, the subsidiary legislation of Forests and Countryside Ordinance (Cap. 96).

c.       Cap. 586: Protection of Endangered Species of Animals and Plants Ordinance

 

 

 

 

(2)                  Mott MacDonald, 2010. Agreement No. CE 45/2008 (CE) Liantang / Heung Yuen Wai Boundary Control Point and Associated Works. Environmental Impact Assessment Report to Hong Kong S.A.R. Government.

(3)                  Arup, 2007. North East New Territories (NENT) Landfill Extension Environmental Impact Assessment Report.


d.       Xing et al. (2000): Xing, F.W., Ng, S.C., Chau, L.K.C. 2000. Gymnosperms and angiosperms of Hong Kong. Memoirs of the Hong Kong Natural History Society 23: 21-136.

For Mott (2010), an ecological baseline survey was conducted between May 2009 and September 2010.  During the baseline study, no flora species of conservation importance was recorded within the Project Site of the current project.

 

2.2           Detailed Vegetation Survey

 

2.2.1      Survey Method

The detailed vegetation survey started after consent of the survey efforts in the Ecological Survey Plan from Government Representatives (incl. EPD and AFCD) was obtained in May 2021. The survey was conducted between May and August 2021.  In addition, a preliminary site visit/survey was conducted as early as the Study kicked off in March 2021, whereby the survey transects to be proposed in the Ecological Survey Plan were surveyed and the locations of previously recorded species of conservation importance were investigated.  The months of preliminary site visit and following surveys covered the flowering seasons of all the four flora species of conservation importance listed in Table 2.1 for their easy identification.

Detailed vegetation survey was conducted by direct observation to record at least the four plant species of conservation importance present in NENTX. In addition, any other plant species of conservation importance (e.g. species protected by local legislation, endemic to Hong Kong or South China, listed in international conventions for conservation of habitat/wildlife, listed in IUCN Red Data Book or those of the South China region and considered as rare in the territory or having special conservation importance by scientific studies) encountered during the surveys were also recorded.

During the surveys, special attention was given to the known/ previously recorded plant species of conservation importance and their corresponding habitat types. Active search in the accessible areas of the green and purple areas were also carried out to maximise the survey effort. The identified floral species of conservation importance was located and mapped on a detailed basemap (1:1000 to 1:5000) and have their locations recorded by a GPS device. Representative photographs of each identified plant species of conservation importance were taken, the number of individuals of species   of conservation importance and their health condition and suitability for transportation, as well as   other useful information (e.g. orientation of each plant and slope gradient, if applicable), were noted wherever applicable.

Each identified individual of the plants was marked with tags, and the areas were demarcated by temporary construction nets or other eye-catching netting for their locations. Each tagged individual was assigned with a unique plant reference number for the ease of post-transplantation monitoring and maintenance.

 

2.2.2      Survey Findings

The Project Site of NENTX is located on a typical hillside area in the northern New Territories of Hong Kong, comprising a series of engineered slopes and natural terrain areas largely planted with common exotic plantation trees and covered by grassy and shrubby communities.  According to the      approved EIA Report, habitats recorded within the Project Site of NENTX included woodland, plantation, grassland with low shrub and stream, which are still the major habitat types within the Project Site presently.  Compared to the approved EIA Report, the landfill area within NENTX in its southeastern portion has extended slightly (Figure 1.1), while more naturally regenerated/ self- seeded native shrub/ small trees (e.g. Ilex asprella, Mallotus paniculatus, Rhus hypoleuca, and Rhodomyrtus tomentosa) have established on the engineering slopes adjacent to the landfill and access road.  Other than these, the baseline habitat conditions within NENTX remain largely unchanged.  Appendix A shows the photographs of the site and habitats within NENTX.


A total of four floral species of conservation importance were identified within the Project Site, namely Incense Tree Aquilaria sinensis, Endospermum Endospermum chinense, Lamb of Tartary Cibotium barometz and Bottlebrush Orchid Goodyera procera. Red Azalea Rhododendron simsii and Bamboo Orchid Arundina graminifolia, which were previously recorded in the approved EIA within the Project Site, were not found during the current detailed vegetation survey.

At least 3 saplings of Incense Tree, 2 trees of Endospermum, 1 individual/ clump of Lamb of Tartary and 19 individuals/ clumps of Bottlebrush Orchid will be directly impacted by the proposed construction of NENTX Landfill. Their locations are shown in Figure 2.1, while photos are in Appendix B. Table 2.2 summarises the number of plant species of conservation importance recorded within the Project Site and their proposed mitigation measures.  Detailed measurements, health conditions and other information are presented in Appendix C.

 

Table 2.2: Ecological Characteristics and Protection Status of Plant Species of Conservation Importance to be Impacted and Proposed Mitigation Measures

 

Species

Conservation/ Protection Status

No. of Individuals Recorded in

Project Site

Flowering Period/ Fruiting

Period

Locations Recorded in Project Site

Proposed Mitigation Measures

Incense Tree Aquilaria sinensis

 土沉香

Common in Hong Kong, protected under Cap. 586; listed in Illustrations of Rare & endangered plant in Guangdong Province (Wu & Hu, 1988) and Threatened Species List of China's Higher Plants (Vulnerable, endemic species) (Qin et al., 2017), status in China as "Near Threatened" (AFCD 2003), listed as "Vulnerable" in China Plant Red Data Book, under State protection (Category II) in China (AFCD 2003), listed in Appendix II of CITES (Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species of Wild Flora and Fauna), classified as "Vulnerable" on the

IUCN Red List.

3 saplings

Mar – May/ Sep – Oct

Along access road and in the woodland along Tong To Ancient Trail north of the access road.

Transplant  to the receptor site

Lamb of Tartary Cibotium barometz

 金毛狗

Protected under Cap. 586; status in China as "Vulnerable", under State protection (Category II) in China

(AFCD 2003), listed

1 individual/ clump

-

In the woodland along Shek Shui Ancient Trail south of

Transplant  to the receptor site.


 

Species

Conservation/ Protection Status

No. of Individuals Recorded in

Project Site

Flowering Period/ Fruiting

Period

Locations Recorded in Project Site

Proposed Mitigation Measures

 

under Appendix II of

CITES

 

 

the access

road.

 

Endospermum Endospermum chinense

 黃桐

Restricted (Xing et al., 2000)

2 mature trees (9-10m in height, see Appendix C for detailed measurements)

May – Aug/ Aug – Nov

On the woody slopes between Shek Tsai Ha Road (i.e. access road) and Shek Shui

Ancient Trail.

Compensate under the TPRP.

Bottlebrush Orchid Goodyera procera

 高斑葉蘭

Protected under Cap. 96 and Cap. 586, but very common in Hong Kong, listed under Appendix II of CITES

19 individuals/ clumps

Mar – Apr/

-

In a stream along Shek Shui Ancient Trail south of the access

road.

Transplant  to the receptor site.

As shown in Table 2.2 above, for the mature trees of Endospermum recorded during the survey, transplantation is considered infeasible due to their relatively low survival rate after transplantation  and potential difficulties in transportation (to receptor site) and setting up temporary support for root pruning on slopes.  Compensation of the trees of Endospermum to be lost will be detailed in the Tree Preservation and Removal Proposal (TPRP), which is another deliverable under this Project to be submitted to and approved by relevant departments before the commencement of construction. The approved TPRP will be sent to EPD and AFCD for record.  The compensated individual of Endospermum will be selected for monitoring over the 10-year period under the ecological monitoring of compensatory woodland.  Detailed monitoring requirements will be included in TPRP.

The recorded Incense Tree saplings, Lamp of Tartary and Bottlebrush Orchids are proposed to be transplanted.  Methodology, implementation programme of the transplantation and post transplantation maintenance and monitoring are detailed in the following sections.

Before the commencement of transplantation, the Contractor should appoint the qualified Ecologist/ Botanist (with at least 5 years of relevant experience in botanical survey) to check if any additional flora species of conservation importance has been missing out within the accessible area of the Project Site.


3.              METHODOLOGY OF TRANSPLANTATION

 

3.1           Preparation before Transplanting

Since Incense Tree saplings, Lamp of Tartary and Bottlebrush Orchids have delicate underground root systems associated with the localised soil microbes (particularly fungal community specialized onto the root systems of orchids), transplanting these individuals with root mass and soil intact, and planting the specimens immediately to the receptor site is regarded as a preferable and feasible transplantation methodology. This can reduce the potential damage to the root systems, interaction between the soil microbes and the plant specimens during the transplant, and maximise the proportion of the root systems to be maintained intact in the root ball after the transplant.  The preparation works before transplanting include but are not included the following.

-      Before the actual transplantation work, the qualified Ecologist/ Botanist (with at least 5 years of relevant experience in transplantation and botanical survey and assessment) should determine the extent of area around each individual/ clump for later excavation.

-      In the area of transplanting of the plants, other vegetation within the same root-ball of the transplant should be retained as far as possible; this is to reduce the potential damage and influence of the underground root system and the ecosystem of soil microbe during the vegetation clearance process. Even if particular vegetation has to be weeded, this should be manually weeded to minimise the damage on target plants.

-      Prior to the commencement of the actual transplantation work, the Works Contractor or landscape contractor, whichever is appropriate, should apply necessary permit(s) under Cap. 96 Forests and Countryside Ordinance and Cap. 586 Protection of Endangered Species of Animals and Plants Ordinance. The application should provide brief information of this Project, the proposed transplantation work, and location maps indicating the collection sites (i.e. the actual locations of the tagged individuals/ clumps of the orchids and fern to be transplanted) and the receptor sites of these transplanted plants to AFCD for consideration.

 

3.2           Transplanting the Plants

Excavation and replanting of the plants into the receptor sites should be completed within a minimal duration in order to minimise exposure time and subsequent mortality due to transplantation shock or disease. It is required to transplant the excavated plant individuals to their final receptor sites within the same day of excavation, and the individuals/ clumps should be transplanted in root balls with root mass and soil intact. The transplantation work should be carried out by landscape contractor and the whole procedure should be supervised by the qualified Ecologist/ Botanist.

Some orchid individuals grew close to each other as inspected during the plant survey. The qualified Ecologist/ Botanist should determine the diameter of the root balls on-site for preparing the transplant. Several orchid individuals growing close together will be transplanted in the same root ball so as to keep the root mass intact as much as possible and minimise potential damage to the underground root systems. Wherever possible, all of the root balls should be prepared with sufficient root ball          depth, about 150 deep for orchid species and at least 300mm deep for other species. However, the actual root ball dimensions and practicality of root ball preparation should be adjusted in accordance with the actual site condition to be determined by the qualified Ecologist/ Botanist, as many individuals of Bottlebrush Orchid were observed to grow on rocks in streambed with small earth pockets.

Once the root ball have been prepared and dug to the desired depth, the root ball should be shaped with sharp spade or knife or similar sharp implement to prevent breaking the root ball. All equipment (such as sharp spade and knife) used in transplantation work should be sterilized before the  transplant and after preparing each root ball of the individual/ clump. This is to minimise any contamination of the soil mass and roots, and spread of disease from one root ball to another through the pruning equipment during the transplant. The equipment should be sterilized with diluted bleach solution and rinsed thoroughly afterwards.


Once the root ball is undercut and prepared, it should be immediately burlapped with damp hessian to keep it moist and minimise soil break-up during transplantation. The ball should then be uplifted carefully and transplanted directly to the receptor site(s).

 

3.3           Selection and Preparation of Receptor Site(s)

Due to the protection/ conservation status of the plants to be transplanted, it is proposed to re-plant them either within facilities managed by the Project Proponent or remote area(s) located away from human disturbances.  In addition, other factors that have been taken into consideration for selection of the receptor site(s) include:

-      similarity in site conditions between the collection site and receptor site, and

-      ease of accessibility as it can facilitate future maintenance and monitoring.

For the three saplings of Incense Tree, they are proposed to be transplanted to the landscaping area(s) near the future office site of the NENTX landfill, with the exact location(s) to be confirmed when the master landscape plan of the NENTX landfill becomes available.

For Lamp of Tartary and Bottlebrush Orchids, receptor sites are proposed in the woodland and catchment at San Kwai Tin Hang (locations of the sites refer to Figures 3.1). The receptor site at  lower section of San Kwai Tin Hang, is on the lower part of a north facing hillside slope sharing the same ecological character of the woodland habitat within the NENTX Project Site. The catchment at the receptor site in San Kwai Tin Hang for Bottlebrush Orchids is a largely natural shady stream with rocky substratum and fast-flowing water; plants were observed to thrive in the riparian zone and the wet places and rocks near and within the stream.  As the stream section proposed to receive the transplanted orchids (more than 130m in length) is much longer then their original site (approx. 30m in length), constraint on its capacity to receive all the transplanted orchids is not anticipated. Hence, the proposed sites are considered environmentally suitable for transplanting the target plants.  Table 3.1 summarises the proposed receptor sites for the three species.  As the proposed receptor sites for Lamp of Tartary and Bottlebrush Orchids are preferably to access through Lin Ma Hang Road where  is a closed area, valid permit from Hong Kong Police Force should be obtained in advance.

 

Table 3.1: Proposed Receptor Sites for Identified Plant Species of Conservation Importance within NENTX Project Site

 

Species

Location of Proposed Receptor Site

Site Condition

Incense Tree

Aquilaria sinensis

Landscaping area(s) near the future office site of the NENTX landfill

-

Lamb of Tartary

Cibotium barometz

Woodland adjacent to San Kwai Tin Hang (Figure 3.1)

The lower part of a north facing hillside slope.

Bottlebrush Orchid

Goodyera procera

Catchment at San Kwai Tin Hang (Figure 3.1)

A largely natural, shady stream with rocky substratum and fast-flowing water.

Minimal site clearance and preparation will be carried out before transplanting the plants to the receptor sites. Planting holes will be excavated on-site after the determination of the actual sizes of the root balls of the transplant. For the Incense Trees and Lamp of Tartary in particular, any large stones or rubbish found in the planting hole should be removed, and compacted soil around the hole should be loosened with a spade to facilitate air penetration.

 

3.4           Planting the Plants at Receptor Site(s)

 

3.4.1      Saplings of Incense Tree

The burlapped root balls of Incense Tree samplings will be transplanted directly into the prepared planting holes/ locations. The root balls will be planted by following the same orientation and soil gradient of their original locations as far as practical. The planting holes should be backfilled with


PROVISION OF CONSULTANCY SERVICES FOR STUDY ON ECOLOGICAL CONDITIONS AND CORRESPONDING TRANSPLANTATION AND TRANSLOCATION FOR NENT LANDFILL EXTENSION

Detailed Vegetation Surveys and Transplantation Proposal


METHODOLOGY OF TRANSPLANTATION


excavated soil until the level with the surrounding ground to limit future settling and prevent air  pockets. The backfill should not be compacted to a density that inhibits root growth, and no fertilizer should be added in the planting holes or on the root ball surface to avoid chemical burning of the roots by the fertilizers. Temporary construction netting or other appropriate eye-catching netting should be set up around the receptor site for demarcating works exclusion zone throughout the construction period of NENTX.

The transplanted plants should be well watered to soak the root balls and the backfilled soil immediately after the transplant. Mulch should be placed around the specimens to retain moisture. Shading nets should be established to provide a semi-shady environment for the transplanted saplings of Incense Tree at least for the first three months; this is to avoid direct exposure of the saplings under the sun. Duration of the provision of shading nets will be adjusted during the post- transplanting monitoring and maintenance period.

 

3.4.2      Lamp of Tartary and Bottlebrush Orchid

The burlapped root balls of Lamp of Tartary and Bottlebrush Orchids (if possible) will be transplanted directly into the prepared planting holes/ locations. The root balls will be planted by following the same orientation and soil gradient of their original locations as far as practical. For the Lamp of Tartary in particular, the planting hole should be backfilled with excavated soil until the level with the   surrounding ground to limit future settling and prevent air pockets. The backfill should not be compacted to a density that inhibits root growth, and no fertilizer should be added in the planting hole or on the root ball surface to avoid chemical burning of the roots by the fertilizers. The transplanted plants will be well watered to soak the root balls and the backfilled soil immediately after the  transplant.

For the Lamp of Tartary, mulch should be placed around the specimens to retain moisture. For the Bottlebrush Orchids, before their root system that enables the plant to withstand water flows develop, wires or other means of supporting may be necessary to temporarily fix the orchids to the nearby large stones.

In order to avoid human disturbances, eye-catching netting to demarcate works exclusion zone would not be necessary.  But for easy recognition of the transplanted plants during post-transplantation maintenance and monitoring period, a numbered tag made of waterproof and durable material should be placed on each individual/ clump; the tags should be maintained throughout the post- transplantation maintenance and monitoring period.

 

3.5           IMPLEMENTATION PROGRAMME

As required in Condition 2.9 of EP-292/2007, all the transplantation works will be carried out before commencement of construction of the Project.  Since the most plants use more energy to sustain their flowers and fruits during flowering/ fruiting period, transplanting of Incense Trees, Lamp of Tartary and Bottlebrush Orchids should be conducted in either spring or a period when the plants are not in bloom (if applicable). This can also reduce the transplantation stock of the transplanted individuals.

According to Table 2.2, flowering/ fruiting periods of Aquilaria sinensis and Goodyera procera range from March to October, while it is not applicable to Cibotium barometz.  For the ease of implementation, transplantation work of the three species should be carried in late wet season or early dry season (late Oct – early Nov).  Post-transplantation maintenance and monitoring will commence immediately after the transplant and be undertaken before the site clearance at the collection sites.


PROVISION OF CONSULTANCY SERVICES FOR STUDY ON ECOLOGICAL CONDITIONS AND CORRESPONDING TRANSPLANTATION AND TRANSLOCATION FOR NENT LANDFILL EXTENSION

Detailed Vegetation Surveys and Transplantation Proposal


POST-TRANSPLANTATION MAINTENANCE AND MONITORING


4.              POST-TRANSPLANTATION MAINTENANCE AND MONITORING

 

The success of the transplanted plants will be monitored by the qualified Ecologist/ Botanist  throughout the post-transplanting maintenance and monitoring period for 12 months. The following monitoring and maintenance requirements apply on the transplanted individuals at their receptor sites.

-      Daily watering will be applied to the transplanted Incense Trees and Lamp of Tartary at least for the first week, and the frequency will be gradually reduced to 2-3 times per week throughout the post-transplantation maintenance period (watering frequency during the wet season shall be adjusted according to weather conditions and instruction from the qualified Ecologist/ Botanist).

-      Fresh water should be used for watering the transplanted specimens. Water should be applied using a rose or a sprinkler and in such a manner that compaction, washout of soil and loosening of plants will not arise. Direct watering onto the leaves and excessive watering in soaking the specimens in water should be avoided.

-      For the Bottlebrush Orchid, since they will be transplanted from the Project Site to the wet areas near or in the stream of receptor site, watering can be conducted less frequently and according to the site conditions and instruction from the qualified Ecologist/ Botanist; however, the orchids should be checked for their health condition in the same frequency as that for the transplanted Incense Trees and Lamp of Tartary.

-      Regular weeding and pest control should be implemented during the post-transplantation maintenance period. Any unwanted weeds (such as Mikania micrantha) found in the receptor sites should be removed by the Contractor once identified or when instructed by the qualified Ecologist/ Botanist. Manual weeding should be conducted to prevent accidental damage to the transplanted specimens.

-      The Contractor should regularly check for any insect attack or fungal infestation during the regular maintenance and monitoring events. Application of chemicals as pest control should be avoided as far as practical. Minor infestations found on the transplanted specimens should be removed manually or with soapy water.

-      The need of fertilization will be determined by the qualified Ecologist/ Botanist in view of the latest growth performance of the transplanted specimens. For the Bottlebrush Orchid, if fertilization is considered necessary, it is preferred to use orchid fertiliser as the standard fertiliser for horticultural use may burn the roots of the orchids.

-      All weeds and rubbish resulting from the weeding and other maintenance activities should be disposed of by the Contractor.

-      The qualified Ecologist/ Botanist will be responsible to conduct regular monitoring and provide advice on maintaining the transplanted specimens.

-      The monitoring will be conducted once per week in the first 3 months and once in each of the following month in the remaining post-transplantation maintenance and monitoring period.

-      The monitoring parameters include but are not limited to health condition, survival and growth performance of each of the transplanted individuals/ clumps. Photographic records will be undertaken for each monitoring event.

-      During construction, operation, restoration and aftercare phases, routine site inspection will be conducted on a weekly basis to audit the mitigation measures on disturbance on habitat adjacent to the work areas. Monitoring of transplantation will be audited as part of the site audit programme.

 

 

 

 


PROVISION OF CONSULTANCY SERVICES FOR STUDY ON ECOLOGICAL CONDITIONS AND CORRESPONDING TRANSPLANTATION AND TRANSLOCATION FOR NENT LANDFILL EXTENSION

Detailed Vegetation Surveys and Transplantation Proposal

5.              REPORTING


REPORTING


 

Monitoring results from each monitoring event will be reported to the Project Proponent on a monthly basis throughout the post-transplantation maintenance and monitoring period for a period of 12 months. Monthly Reports should include the following information. The first monthly report will also include transplanting details, including but not limited to an update description of the physical environment of the receptor site, health conditions and photos of the transplanted species.

-      Date(s) of monitoring and maintenance implementation of the reporting month,

-      Key findings of the post-transplantation monitoring, including but not limited to photographic records of the transplanted plants of conservation importance at the receptor site(s) and conditions of the transplanted plants (see Appendix D for a sample data sheet),

-      Recommendation on post-transplantation maintenance, and

-      Key maintenance activities conducted in the reporting month.

A Final Monitoring Report summarising the monitoring results throughout the post-transplantation maintenance and monitoring period will be reported to the Project Proponent. This is used to evaluate the success of the transplantation works for the transplanted flora species of conservation  importance. The monthly & final post-transplantation monitoring reports will be submitted to EPD and AFCD for deposit.